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Stephen O'Brien

StephenOBrien

Stephen O'Brien

The City College of New York
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Email: sobrien@ccny.cuny.edu
Telephone: (212) 650-8371



Research Interest

Nanomaterials synthesis, properties and structural characterization: Nanoparticle synthesis and self-assembly into superlattices. Transition metal oxide nanomaterials, high k dielectrics/memory materials. Applications of nanomaterials to cleantechnology, energy storage and power conversion.

STEPHEN O'BRIEN is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at City College and a member of the CUNY Energy Institute. He also has appointments on the Doctoral Faculty of the CUNY Graduate Center and Grove School of Engineering Department of Chemical Engineering. Steve is an established academic researcher in nanotechnology, with expertise in inorganic materials chemistry and materials science and engineering, applied physics. His disciplinary areas: Nanomaterials synthesis, properties and structural characterization: Nanoparticle synthesis and self-assembly into superlattices. Transition metal oxide nanomaterials, high k dielectrics/memory materials: perovskites and garnets at the nanoscale, ferroics. As a Principal Investigator, he is leader and advisor of research projects to a team of PhD and post-doctoral research scientists. Prior to joining CUNY in 2009, Steve was associate professor of materials science and engineering at Columbia University Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics. He is published in 75 articles as lead author or co-author in peer reviewed American and international research journals, including Nature, Science. He invented new methods for the preparation of electronic materials for the semiconductor industry and other areas of nanotechnology, with 7 pending patents. He is a NSF CAREER recipient. Steve has a D.Phil from Oxford University in materials chemistry, with Dermot O’Hare. He completed Post-Doctoral Research in Materials Science at UC Santa Barbara with Galen Stucky (1998-199) and later at Columbia University and IBM TJ Watson Research Center (1999-200) with Louis E. Brus and Christopher B. Murray.